Fire risk assessments

A fire risk assessment (FRA) is like a health check for a building's fire safety. 

These checks are carried out either annually or three yearly on blocks with communal areas, depending on the type of the building and the level of risk the assessor places on it. They are also subject to review following an incident, a change in legislation or alteration to the building.

FRAs identify potential fire risks found at the time the assessment was carried out. They also identify the measures that should be taken to minimise or remove that risk. 

An FRA does not look at anything inside individual properties. Some of the key things FRAs look at are:

  • Exit routes

  • Structural measures in place to stop or slow down the spread of a fire 

  • Whether there is anything inside the building that could start, accelerate or spread a fire.

Fire risk assessments map and FAQs

You can use the map below to find the FRA for your block. Once you have found your address, click on the blue house icon and then select the link that appears under 'Link to FRA' on the left hand side. 

We have answered some frequently asked questions (FAQs) about FRAs and how to read one underneath the map. Please read these alongside the FRA.

If you are concerned by or would like to discuss anything you have seen in the FRAs, please contact us and we will be happy to answer any questions or comments.

Why does SHP publish FRAs?

We publish FRAs because we want to give you as much information as possible about fire safety in your home. We want to be open and transparent about fire safety, and how we work together to keep you safe. 

You share the responsibility for keeping your home safe with SHP. We will work with you to help you understand how we do this, and how you can keep yourself safe. 

What are residents responsible for?

You share the responsibility for keeping your building safe and minimising the risk of fire with SHP. You can take simple steps to keep your home safe.

When you’re at home, make sure you follow these key pieces of advice from the fire brigade:

  • Keep corridors and communal areas clear of objects or litter

  • Be careful with candles and keep them away from curtains, carpets, furniture, bedding and other flammable items

  • Keep matches and lighters out of reach of children

  • Don't leave cigarettes, pipes or candles unattended

  • Use deep ashtrays to prevent cigarettes from rolling out – and don't throw hot ash into waste bins

  • Make sure you switch off heaters and cookers when you're not using them

  • Don't use or store devices that run on a gas cylinder.

  • Don’t leave leave cooking unattended on the hob or grill – if you have to leave the kitchen, turn off the heat. 

Click here for more fire safety advice from the London Fire Brigade, or to book a home fire safety visit. 

If you own a vehicle, please consider where you park on your estate to help firefighters respond to 999 calls. Avoid parking close to estate fire gates, entrances and exits and leave enough space for larger vehicles to pass your vehicle.

If you have concerns about fire safety on your estate, or if you see anything that may pose a fire risk such as rubbish in corridors or bad parking, please contact your Housing Manager immediately during work hours. You can call 020 8770 5000 out of hours in an emergency.

If you are concerned by or would like to discuss anything you have seen in the FRAs, please contact us and we will be happy to answer any questions or comments.

Who carries out a fire risk assessment?

FRAs are carried out by accredited fire risk assessors who are suitably trained and experienced, and who apply an industry standard process.

What are the different ratings used in a fire risk assessment?

Fire hazards are rated on how likely a fire is to occur and how severe it would be. Fire risk assessors look at likelihood and severity to identify high, medium or low risk hazards. Any hazards are reviewed and then prioritised in terms of the work needed to resolve the issue. 

Work needed can range from the removal of combustible items within the building, to fixing damaged or faulty fire doors or smoke vents.

High risk hazards will be resolved as soon as reasonably possible with the highest of priority, medium within three months, and low risk within six months.

When do issues raised in an FRA get completed?

Issues raised in FRAs are prioritised according to their hazard rating (see above). 

High risk hazards will be resolved as soon as reasonably possible with the highest of priority, medium within three months, and low risk within six months. 

What about issues or hazards that arise in between FRAs?

FRAs offer a snapshot of the fire safety of a building at the time of inspection.  They don’t take into account changes to things like obstructions or breakages in between FRAs. For example, if a fire door is damaged in between FRAs or items are left in the corridor.

We monitor buildings on an ongoing basis for hazards like this, and ask you to work with us to avoid and resolve them. 

This is why it is important that you report any concerns you might have about fire safety.

We are also regularly inspecting buildings for a number of other purposes and are training all of our staff to identify and report concerns and issues. We will always take appropriate action to remediate fire risk management issues as quickly as possible.

The FRA mentions groups given special consideration, but says no information has been provided. Why not?

FRAs provide an overview of the fire safety of communal areas of a building, so this information is not included. 

If you are worried about your ability to leave your home in the event of an emergency you should contact your Housing Manager. They can talk to you about this and other fire safety concerns.

I'm worried about getting out of my home in an emergency - what should I do?

If you are worried about your ability to leave your home in the event of an emergency you should contact your Housing Manager. They can talk to you about this and other fire safety concerns.

Why have some parts of the FRA for my block been blanked out?

We have removed or blanked out photographs or addresses that might identify individual residents. We do this to protect people’s privacy. We will leave as much information in as possible so that you can understand the issues identified in FRAs and how we work to resolve these.

Not all of the actions listed in the FRA for my block have been completed - why not?

Issues raised in FRAs are prioritised according to their hazard rating (see above). 

High risk hazards will be resolved as soon as reasonably possible with the highest of priority, medium within three months, and low risk within six months. 

Some works might be completed at the same time as other repairs to minimise disruption. 

If you have concerns about any actions that you do not believe have been completed, please contact us at customercare@suttonhousingpartnership.org.uk or call 020 8915 2000.

Does it mean my block isn’t safe if a hazard is identified?

No. It is the combination of all fire safety measures which keep a building safe. Overall safety will not be compromised by a single issue. 

All SHP blocks have an up-to-date fire risk assessment and priority actions are dealt with urgently.

What do the abbreviations used in an FRA mean?

FRA - fire risk assessment

LHS - left hand side

RHS - right hand side

BS___ - British Standard, a code of practice or guidance which users must pay for 

PAS__ - Publicly Available Specification, similar to BS but it is free to access this guidance

HSE - Health and Safety Executive, the government body that oversees health and safety law

RIDDOR - reporting of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences regulations

FD30S or FD60S - doors that are designed to prevent the spread of smoke and fire for 30 or 60 minutes

BRE - Building Research Establishment, a not for profit organisation that carries out research and testing of cladding systems for example

BMS - building management system, coordinates systems in a building such as fire detection or sprinkler systems

O&M manual - operation and maintenance manual, instructions for the building

Grade D: LD2 - a grade of fire detection system, within properties this is usually a mains powered, battery back-up, interlinked (to other detectors within the property) heat detector in the kitchen and smoke detectors in the hall and landing and possibly living room.